The Leesa mattress is one of the top-selling and top-rated boxed beds sold directly to consumers. It is sold only on the Leesa site and through their listing on Amazon. As with the others, it is compressed, vacuum wrapped, rolled and inserted into a shipping box which is then delivered by UPS Ground.

A mattress-in-a-box competitor close in composition to Leesa is the Casper Mattress. Both Leesa Sleep and Casper Sleep were started by mattress industry veterans. Philip Krim of Angel Beds led the team establishing Casper, while Leesa Sleep CEO Jamie Diamonstein is from the family owning Paramount Sleep. The Casper Mattress is a latex/memory foam hybrid, and Leesa uses Avena , a latex replacement, and memory foam. The covers of both are stretchable woven fabrics. Principal differences are in the number, density and heights of the layers.

Composition

The LeesaMattress has three layers: two comfort layers of Avena and memory foam, and the base layer of polyurethane. It is designed, from the top to the bottom, for initial cushioning, conformity, and underlying support.

       Cover

The woven fabric in Leesa’s cover is a blend of polyester and lycra. Polyester is used in many fabric blends for its durability. Lycra (spandex) provides stretchability, and is used in woven fabrics for this purpose. The cover is cut from one piece of fabric, the only stitching above the bottom is on the corners. This means no seams on the top edges.

Lessa offers a choice of cover patterns, Classic and Airlifting. The cover has three woven-in stripes. This pattern alone is the Classic. Airlifting adds vector lines with arrow heads.

classicairlift

                     Leesa Classic                                                  Leesa Airlifting        

       Top Layer

The top comfort layer in the Leesa Mattress is 2” of 3.6-lb. Avena. This material was developed by Carpenter Co. as a replacement for latex. According to Carpenter, a manufacturer of cushioning materials, it is “Better than memory foam, more comfortable than latex.” In its properties, it is more like latex than like memory foam. The Avena in the Leesa is denser than the 3.3-lb. latex in Casper. It is also a half-inch thicker.

       Middle Layer

The second layer in the Leesa is 2” of memory foam, compared to 1½” in Casper. At 3 lbs. it is less dense than the 4-lb. memory foam in Casper. This means that it is more pressure sensitive and less heat sensitive in Leesa, which makes it cooler and more responsive.

Both Lessa and Casper have reversed the order of materials of the Fibro-Pedic, which has latex beneath the memory foam. When Dr. Swartzburg designed the Fibro-Pedic to treat fibromyalgia, he put the memory foam on top for its pressure relief, with the zoned latex below for shaped resilience.

       Base Layer

The base support layer in Leesa is, as in Casper, 1.8-lb. polyurethane foam. This is the standard density of base foam, as is seen in most foam support cores across the market. This support core is 6” high in Leesa. It is only 5” in Casper. This is because Casper has a 1½” transition layer between the base and the comfort layers.

Cooling

Memory foam has a well-deserved reputation for building up heat until it becomes uncomfortably warm, due to the fact that it is denser and more heat sensitive than polyurethane and latex foams. This accounts for Leesa and Carpenter placing well-ventilated Avena or latex above the memory foam. It also appears to be the reason why the memory foam is only 3 or 4 pounds density, and the Avena in Leesa is convoluted on the underside. One concern of lighter memory foam is its durability. Denser memory foam is not only more contouring, but more durable.

Some manufacturers, such as Selectabed (with its Airflow Transfer System [ATS]) and Tempur-Pedic (in its Breeze models) use airflow to cool memory foam mattresses. Dr. Swartzburg made a video which shows how ATS works.

Comparison Chart

Here is a chart comparing Leesa with the Casper Mattress:

comparison-of-leesa-and-casper